Macon, GA
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July 16, 2024 10:07 am

Georgia families struggle to buy food during summer as state declines to extend enhanced benefits

Stanley Dunlap’s Georgia Recorder article examines the impact of the cessation of enhanced SNAP benefits in Georgia, highlighting the challenges faced by low-income families, such as Tasha Marshall, who relied on the additional food assistance to provide meals during school breaks and summers.

New regulations target transportation emissions in Georgia

The implementation of new federal clean-truck standards in Georgia, starting in 2027, is poised to enhance air quality and public health, targeting the state’s largest source of greenhouse-gas emissions. Bridget Murphy Brown, a public health advocate and Georgia registered nurse, emphasizes the positive impact on vulnerable communities living near major transportation routes, while urging further collaborative efforts to address the health implications of emissions and promote a healthier environment for future generations.

Bill to create Ocmulgee Mounds National Park near Macon gets broad backing from Georgia delegation

by Ross Williams, Georgia RecorderMay 3, 2024 If you could travel back in time to visit the Macon Plateau of more than a thousand years ago, you’d see a community made up of ancestors of the Muscogee people living, meeting, growing food and burying their dead in earthen mounds, some of which are still around …

New EPA rules target Georgia legacy coal-ash ponds

The Environmental Protection Agency has implemented a new rule tightening regulations on coal ash disposal, addressing millions of tons of toxic waste that were previously unregulated and often ended up in unlined ponds and landfills. This significant regulatory step is part of a broader initiative to curb pollutants from power plants and represents a major victory for environmental health, according to Dori Jaffe of the Sierra Club.

Earth Day report card: Georgians battle threats to state’s natural wonders year round

Georgia environmentalists mark Earth Day with both celebrations and concerns, as recent policy decisions threaten to undermine the state’s ecological health. Amid ongoing debates, conservation efforts confront challenges from industrial developments and regulatory policies favoring economic interests over environmental preservation.

Rural counties rely on prisons to provide firefighters who work for free

In rural Georgia, incarcerated individuals trained as firefighters and emergency responders are frequently called upon to tackle various emergencies, a practice that began in 1963 and has expanded significantly over the decades. Despite providing crucial support in under-resourced areas, this program faces criticism for potentially exploiting the incarcerated and impacting the job market for professional firefighters.

Critics pan Georgia Power fossil fuel plans ahead of state PSC hearing

During a hearing, a Georgia Power representative urged the Public Service Commission to support a stipulated agreement that offers financial protection for ratepayers, despite criticisms that the company’s plans are unrealistic and could increase its carbon footprint. Critics argue that replacing the expanded use of fossil fuels with more renewable energy in the plan could prevent significant environmental impacts.

If the Okefenokee isn’t worth saving, what is?

In this opinion piece by Dink Nesmith for the Georgia Recorder, the focus is on the heated debate surrounding the proposed mining near the Okefenokee Swamp by Twin Pines Minerals, where financial interests clash with environmental preservation. Nesmith criticizes the influence of monetary interests on Georgia’s decision-makers and expresses concern over the potential ecological impact on this irreplaceable natural gem, urging for the protection of the swamp over economic gains.

Experts: New EPA air pollution standards a win for public health

The Environmental Protection Agency’s new air pollution standards aimed at reducing tailpipe pollution from cars and light/medium vehicles for models years 2027 through 2032 are expected to trigger a significant shift towards hybrid and electric vehicles, aligning with the Biden administration’s goal for a 60% emission reduction from new vehicles by 2030. These measures are not only anticipated to prevent over 7 billion tons of carbon emissions but also to save the nation $13 billion in healthcare costs due to improved air quality, despite expected legal challenges from the fossil fuel industry.